Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Thoughts on writing about vampires. . .



I know that I find juxtaposing vampires against human traits allows me to better understand human beings, and thereby vampires. I have also discovered, during my writing journey of three completed vampire novels to date and one close to being finished while another in the plotting stage, that a fully developed human character will be even more conflicted as vampire than as a human being. Adding endless time to the journey of your character opens up a whole host of issues and concerns. And imagine if you lose your true love as that loss is forever. . .


The character in my second book of the Forever Series titled Forever Woman, has chosen to become a vampire because she is ill with a deadly human disorder that will drastically shorten her life. Turning vampire seems a better alternative to certain death. But then she meets her true love and finds she would rather have a year or two with him than live forever without him. (However she has unleashed a new set of events that might derail what she now wants in life—ya got to read the book to find out how it all works out for her!) A truly human concern to, of course, but living forever puts a whole new complexion on many things.

Another example of how it changes for eternity’s creature: Your regrets are yours to the end of time. My vampires sometimes make light of this drawback, but the pathos that this ensures for my characters sometimes makes them more than human to me. They endure the knowledge of losing loved ones, doing the wrong thing and generally messing up for all time. I know we tell others not to live with regret, to stay the course and finish our ephemeral lives without them, but who among us can say that we have done that? (Though if you have managed this, my hats off to you!)

Sometimes, I know, I’m afraid to say to people that I write about vampires. I fear the prejudice. I have experienced it first hand: I would never read anything like that being a common mantra from the disbelievers. But I am most grateful for what my imaginary creatures have taught me. That one can live for all eternity with dignity and grace. But, maybe just not without regret.

January Bain
www.januarybain.ca
The Forever Series

6 comments:

Julie Eberhart Painter said...

Regret is a negative, a waste of time, but so human.

January Bain said...

That it is Julie!

♥cupcake♥ said...

never ever let others judge you by what you want if it makes you happy.

Rhobin said...

Luckily, for every reader who says I'd never read anything like that, there are other eager to read what you write. I think all of our characters teach us.

January Bain said...

Thanks cupcake! Being happy is the best one can aspire to!

January Bain said...

Thanks Rhobin, you're quite right!